Homework Policy

Basic Philosophy on Homework:

Homework must be meaningful activity.  There is no value in busy work, just for the sake of doing more. Families have busy schedules, and kids do not need more pressure in their lives. Teachers lead busy lives too and do not need a lot of additional accounting responsibilities. Homework should not set up stress between children and parents or teachers. In cases where a child struggles to learn, more time or support at home or outside of school time may be needed. Ideally, homework could be optional, but when it is meaningful, students, teachers and parents will see its value as a support for academic success. Individual student learning goals can be achieved with the help of differentiated homework. Regular homework that will improve student achievement and skills can provide a foundation for good study habits as students matriculate through the grades. Working on projects at home can provide time for focused, in-depth learning to be presented in school. Such assignments could occur once periodically throughout the year.

 

Guidelines for Homework at MPCS:

First and Second Grades: 

At this stage, children will not receive regular homework.  As projects are assigned, there may be some at-home work to be completed, but this will only be a few times per year, and there will be ample communication between teacher and parent to help facilitate the work at home. Parents are fully involved in the homework. If the teacher feels additional support is needed at home for children to learn Dolch sight words or math facts, then such practice may be requested by the teacher. Parents will be asked to read to their child for 15-20 minutes per day (in the evenings) at least five days per week.

 

Third Grade: 

Regular homework begins, with no more than 20 minutes per day on weekdays, and none over the weekends.  Work will be meaningful, will help reinforce concepts/skills taught in class or will be in conjunction with a project.  The purpose at this stage is to familiarize students and families with homework.  Children should start to form good habits around homework. Parents are still very involved in the homework. In addition, children are asked to read 20 minutes per day during week days (after school).

Appropriate homework suggestions:

  1. Math practice, especially when it can be hands-on practice and not simply more worksheets (measure your desk at home; play math type family games at home; practice your times tables)
  2. Nightly reading with a log
  3. Writing practice
  4. Work on a project
  5. Spelling or vocabulary words to practice

 

Fourth Grade:

Regular homework continues.  Nightly work should be no more than 30 minutes and not assigned on weekends. The purpose at this stage is to have students take more responsibility for their work.  They should turn it in daily or weekly and be held accountable for this work through non-punitive measures.  Parents are still very involved in the homework. In addition, children are asked to read 20 minutes per day during week days (after school).

  1. Math practice, especially when it can be hands-on practice and not simply more worksheets (measure your desk at home; play math type family games at home; practice your times tables)
  2. Nightly reading with a log
  3. Writing practice
  4. Work on a project
  5. Spelling or vocabulary words to practice
  6. Creative projects that help introduce time management skills
  7. Book projects

 

Fifth/Sixth Grade:

Regular homework should not be more than 40 minutes a night and should not be assigned on weekends. The purpose to this stage is to continue good homework habits, take more responsibility for their work, and begin to practice time-management skills.  Parents are still involved and should be helping their child as needed, though some work could be done without parental support. In addition, children are asked to read at least 20 minutes per day during week days (after school).

Appropriate homework suggestions:

  1. Math practice, especially when it can be hands-on practice and not simply more worksheets (measure your desk at home; play math type family games at home; practice your times tables)
  2. Nightly reading with a log
  3. Writing practice
  4. Work on a project
  5. Spelling or vocabulary words to practice
  6. Creative projects that help introduce time management skills
  7. Book projects
  8. Research projects
  9. Reading for content
  10. Studying for End of Main Lesson Block Assessments

 

Seventh/Eighth Grade:

Regular homework will be around 45 minutes a night on the weekdays. There will be more long term assignments along with the daily practice.  Parent should be involved so that they know what their children should be working on and should be able to ascertain easily from the teacher if homework is being turned in promptly. In addition, children are asked to read at least 20 minutes per day during week days (after school).

Appropriate homework suggestions:

  1. Math practice, especially when it can be hands-on practice and not simply more worksheets (measure your desk at home; play math type family games at home; practice your times tables)
  2. Nightly reading with a log
  3. Writing practice
  4. Work on a project
  5. Spelling or vocabulary words to practice
  6. Creative projects that help introduce time management skills
  7. Book projects
  8. Research projects
  9. Reading for content
  10. Studying for End of Main Lesson Block Assessments

MPCS is an asbestos-free school. Copies of our Asbestos Management Plan are located in both the main and middle school offices for public viewing.